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3 edition of Optical levitation particle delivery system for dual beam fiber optic trap found in the catalog.

Optical levitation particle delivery system for dual beam fiber optic trap

Tom Athanasios Frangioudakis

Optical levitation particle delivery system for dual beam fiber optic trap

by Tom Athanasios Frangioudakis

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Published by Laurentian University, Department of Physics and Astronomy in Sudbury, Ont .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby Tom Athanasios Frangioudakis.
The Physical Object
Paginationx, 84 l. :
Number of Pages84
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20768162M
ISBN 10061261266X
OCLC/WorldCa51041499

This optical levitation work did not receive much attention when optical tweezers were developed, and it has remained a niche area that was far removed from mainstream optical manipulation research. It was not until very recently that any airborne particle was actually trapped within a conventional (high-numerical-aperture) optical trap.   Optical Levitation of Micro-Scale Particles in Air Success has been achieved using a radiation pressure gradient to levitate microscale particles in air for as long as four hours. This work is performed as a precursor to the development of a vacuum based optical tweezers interrogation tool for nanotechnology research.

Fiber optofluidic (FOF) technology is an important branch of optofluidics. As shown in Figure 1, FOF has four major types of structures, the fiber-optic interferometer, fiber grating, microstructured optical fibers (MOFs), and optical micro/nano practice, FOFs show several notable superiorities [3,4].FOF devices are inexpensive and simple thanks to the mature manufacturing technology. The dual beam optical trap was first realized by Ashkin back in , 15 years before the first optical tweezer. Subsequently, the first fiber-based version of the optical trap was successfully used to trap polystyrene spheres and yeast cells in by Constable et al. [ 32 ], and several interesting declinations of this first fiber-based.

FIG. 1. (a) The trapping beam delivery system was based on a 5 W, nm CW laser. The beam passed through a waveplate, Pockels cell, and polariser allowing static and real time power control. This was coupled into a single mode optical fibre via a 10⇥ objective, with light delivered to the trap remotely by the fibre. Fiber coupling with adaptive optics for free-space optical communication Thomas Weyraucha, Mikhail A. Vorontsova, John W. Gowens IIa, Thomas G. Bifanob a U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Computational and Information Science Directorate, Powder Mill Road, Adelphi, MD b Boston University, Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Brookline, MA


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Optical levitation particle delivery system for dual beam fiber optic trap by Tom Athanasios Frangioudakis Download PDF EPUB FB2

Optical levitation particle delivery system for a dual beam fiber optic trap. Gauthier RC(1), Frangioudakis A. Author information: (1)Department of Physics and Astronomy, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario P3E-2C6, by: We combine a radiation-pressure-based levitation system with a dual fiber, laser trapping system to demonstrate the potential of delivering single particles into the fiber trap.

The forces versus position and the trajectory of the particle subjected to the laser beams are examined with an enhanced ray optics model. A sequence of video images taken from the experimental apparatus demonstrates.

Optical Levitation Particle Delivery System for a Dual Beam Fiber Optic Trap. Robert C. Gauthier and Athanasios Frangioudakis, Optical levitation particle delivery system for a dual beam fiber optic trap, Applied Optics, 39, 1, (26), (). Crossref Robert C. Gauthier and Athanasios Frangioudakis, Theoretical investigation of the optical trapping properties of a micro-optic cubic glass structure, Applied Optics, 39 Cited by:   Gauthier, R.

& Frangioudakis, A. Optical levitation particle delivery system for a dual beam fiber optic trap. Applied opt 26–33 (). ADS CAS PubMed Google Scholar. Gauthier R. & Frangioudakis A. Optical levitation particle delivery system for a dual beam fiber optic trap.

Applied opt 26–33 (). [Google Scholar] Liu Y. & Yu M. Investigation of inclined dual-fiber optical tweezers for 3D manipulation and force sensing.

Optics expr – (). [Google Scholar] Domachuk P. We propose and demonstrate a novel approach to transport a strongly absorbing particle in an X-typed trajectory reciprocally in pure liquid glycerol based on a dual-beam optical fiber trap.

We perform the X-typed light field by integrating a glass microsphere on the tip of a two-core fiber. The motion of the absorbing particle in pure liquid glycerol is dominated by the &#x;α-type.

This dual-beam fiber optical trap is a much more concise implementation of A. Ashkin’s dual beam radiation pressure trap (Fig.

2a). The fiber-based beam delivery provides a larger lateral space for other optical or mechanical probe to investigate trapped objects and possibility to integrate with on-chip device (Fig.

2b, c) [41,42,43]. OZ Optics offers a broad range of laser to fiber delivery systems for telecom and scientific applications. The increasing use of polarization maintaining fiber at the initiation point of signals is driving demand for polarization maintaining laser diode-to-fiber couplers.

Our polarization maintaining couplers, which include hermetically sealable versions, are designed to minimize coupling loss. to as a single-beam gradient force trap.

Recently, the technique of shaping the trapping beam with a spatial light modulator (Holographic Optical Tweezers [4] and the Generalized Phase Contrast.

Up to now, there have been extensive studies and promising applications relating to optical levitation, such as three-dimensional force-field microscopy, levitating granules [18, 19], dual-beam fibre-optic traps, optical tweezers, and so on.

When loading atoms into an optically levitated dipole trap, the levitated laser provides an axial. Gauthier R. & Frangioudakis A. Optical levitation particle delivery system for a dual beam fiber optic trap.

Applied opt 26–33 (). Liu Y. & Yu M. Investigation of inclined dual-fiber optical tweezers for 3D manipulation and force sensing.

Optics expr – (). Domachuk P. et al. Application of optical trapping. Optical forces acting on a sphere were experimentally analyzed to investigate the single-beam fiber optic trap using a cleaved optical fiber or a lensed optical fiber. A stable optical trap could be created at the point where the x-directed (horizontal) optical forces were precisely balanced, and the vector sum of axial and transverse forces acting on a sphere gave a restoring force directed.

tical trap formed by the dual-beam optical tweezers with the LG 03 beams, as functions of the power mismatch ratio q and particle size R. The blue ‘’ denotes a stably trapped sphere for light absorption suppression and equilibrium temperature simulation later.

(f) The same as (e), but for the right circularly polarized LG beams. Other. so without causing damage. The development of the single beam optical trap was an important advance in optical tweezers, because it can be designed relatively simply, and has the advantage that a single microscope can be used to trap and view the particle simultaneously.

Early optical tweezers were all either optical two-beam traps or required an. The result is an important step toward explaining physical phenomena in a dual-beam fiber-optic trap with transverse offset, and is generally applicable to achieving controllable motions of.

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We report on the design, construction, and characterisation of a new class of in-vacuo optical levitation trap optimised for use in high-intensity, high-energy laser interaction experiments.

The system uses a focused, vertically propagating continuous wave laser beam to capture and manipulate micro-targets by photon momentum transfer at much longer working distances than commonly used by. The levitation of liquid droplets led to the first observation of the influence of Mie resonances on the magnitude of the radiation pressure force required to levitate a spherical and Dziedzic reported that the size of the droplet could be determined with a precision of 1 part in 10 5 by monitoring the radiation pressure force exerted as a function of levitation wavelength.

beam, as was first demonstrated by Ashkin in [16]. 15, Up to now, there have been extensive studies and promis-ing applications relating to optical levitation, such as three-dimensional force-field microscopy [17], levitating granules [18, 19], dual-beam fibre-optic traps [15], optical.

Optical levitation of micrometer-sized particles by laser radiation pressure (RP) was first demonstrated in the early seventies by Ashkin et al., in the US, followed by Roosen and Imbert in France.

A levitation setup, in simplest form, uses a vertical (∥ z ˆ) moderately focused laser beam, a few μm in diameter, and a transparent spherical particle (). Optical levitation of highly transparent particles has been observed in the high‐vacuum regime where viscous damping and thermal conductivity are small, the particle is cooled only by thermal radiation, and radiometric forces are negligible.

The effects of an impulse and adiabatic manipulation on the dynamics of a sphere were studied from atmospheric pressure down to ∼10 −6 Torr.particle in the trap center and the reference beam, and / z ¼ 2k 0z is the phase change of the particle due to its motion along the optical axis, where k 0 ¼ 2p=k is the wavevector.

Note that a small displacement of z(t) along the optical axis leads to 2zðtÞ optical path difference between the backscat-tered and the reference light.